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William A. Faust

A Singular Love: Diary of a Marriage

A SINGULAR LOVE:
DIARY OF A MARRIAGE


DESCRIBED AS "A LABOR OF LOVE" BY THE AUTHOR


When William (Bill) A. Faust first saw "the girl in the red coat" in September of 1956, little did he suspect
what it would lead to 20 months later!

- A marriage that would last more than four decades
- Create three children (Bill, Susan and Lauren)
- Take Bill, Pat and the children from Phoenix to Chicago, St. Louis and Kansas City

And a book that provides rewarding reading for the young as well as the not-so-young as well as the old!

- Evokes memories of a "kinder, gentler time" for seniors
- Provides useful insights for the 30-50 reader
- Prepares young readers for "taking the big step"
- The joy of love
- Dealing with life
- Dealing with death

"I spent much of 2015 and most of 2016 focusing on A Singular Love, was constantly frustrated, and thought the writing would never end!" says Faust.
The creative process involved dragging numerous boxes of letters, photos and greeting cards out of the attic. And plowing through hundreds of letters exchanged between he and his wife over 44 years. Inspired by a winning entry in his alma mater's -- Arizona State University -- 2010 ASU Newsletter's Valentine Day Contest, the 80 year-old author compares writing the book to giving birth without labor pains. "I wonder how Pat would have liked that description," he says wryly.

Chapter headings such as The Winter of Our Discontent and Life without Pat reflect the humor and intimacy captured by Bill's book. A Singular Love enhances this journey of a marriage with discussions of shared values, the joy of laughing together and what it takes to keep love alive.

Available at Amazon
Available on Amazon

"I Love You"

"Parked in my car in front of Arizona State University's North Hall, we said to each other for the first time - 'I love you' - on the evening of October 15th, 1956."

This video presents William A (Bill) Faust reading the introduction to the letter he wrote to Pat that night...




Q & A with the author

William A. Faust

Q. Why the title, “A Singular Love: Diary of a Marriage“?

A. The title’s genesis comes from two sentences in a letter that I wrote to Pat four years after we were married: “Though love is universal ours is singular and individual, unique between ourselves, and beautiful to be a part of. For it and you I thank our creator.” Of course, the book’s foundation also rests on the notes, cards, and letters that we sent to each other throughout our marriage. If it were not for them, I might as well have written a romance novel.

Q. What was the writing experience like for you?

A. It was unlike anything I have ever done. For all those first time authors out there, I would love to share my experiences with you. As a process it was probably the hardest thing I have ever done. Hard because the writing process is hard. The research, using the proper grammar, constructing readable sentences. To actually write a story that flows, is not forced, and engages the reader.


Q. What did you hope to accomplish by writing the book?

A. When I first started the book the consensus of the “experts” was that its main market would be “older women”. But the more I wrote and the more the book took shape, the more I hoped to reach young adults with the story I had to tell. This came home to me when I wrote Chapter 7, “Life Without Pat”. In this chapter I talk about the two albums that I made for our children and gave to them as Christmas presents. Pat had saved all of the Mothers’ Day Cards that they had sent her. I collected them and gave each child an album of the cards they had sent her.

The second album provided a major part of the material that I used in the book. In the last sentence of the letter that I used to preface the second album I said the following: “May you discover in these pages a new sense of the joy, tears, passion, and love that brought each of you into this world! Merry Christmas, Dad”.

My hope is that the book does for my readers what I wanted that album to do for my children: Allow them to see how, in real life, two people can express in their own unique way the most important elements of a successful marriage. Namely, Commitment, Shared Values, and Laughter-all wrapped up in the Love that started it all!

In naming these values I also believe that it is worthwhile to point out that the importance of laughter in a marriage cannot be overstated. For example, at some point during our courtship Pat, in all seriousness, pointed out to me that what was important in a relationship was, “being able to overlook the other person’s faults.” I responded, “Easy for you to say!” She laughed and married me anyway! Bless her for her sense of humor.

As I wrote our story and shared the intimacies of our thoughts and expressions of love for each other I worried about the “rightness” of sharing such personal matters with others. Since I had already shared much of this material with our children it did make it easier to share it with a larger audience; and, in the final analysis, it is the truth of the story that I believe makes the book meaningful. I must also add that for those who may still believe the book is too revealing please keep in mind that this is the expurgated version of our story! I rest my case.

Q. One last question - any advice for first time writers?

A. I started the book when I was 78 and will soon turn 81. But I actually think I am now about 85. Seriously, I would love to talk to first time writers about my experience. There is so much to learn about the process. One of the most important aspects is selecting a publisher. I didn’t have any luck with the company I first picked and ultimately changed to Outskirts Press. I was very glad I did. There is much to go into here. However, I would love to hear from people and try to address any questions they may have.

Q. Another question suddenly arises - especially since we have been talking about Chapter 7, “Life Without Pat“. This chapter is really about grief and how you dealt with it. Can you give any more insight into that?

A. I’m not sure that I can because the chapter speaks for itself; however, the one thing I can say is not to let the grief consume you. During the course of my eighty plus years, I have lost 15 people – including Pat, family and friends that I loved and was close to. On page 224 of the softcover edition of the book is a picture that I treasure of my Mother, Father, Aunt Lovena, and Pat and all of them are now gone. I have learned not to mourn their passing but to love the truth that my life was made better and richer by each of them and many others who also touched my life.


When You Are Old
W. B. Yeats

One of the most moving poems that I was able to use in the book is the beautiful work, When You are Old, by William B. Yeats. I believe that poetry can touch the heart. This poem certainly touched mine and I would like to read it for you.




Contact

William A. Faust

William A. Faust
Email: Bill@WilliamAFaust.com
Phone: 480.664.1141

Member Arizona Authors Association
www.azauthors.com/user/68devil/

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Available at Amazon
Available on Amazon



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